Berkeley Rep Blog

Previous entry: Hanging out with the Idiot interns
Next entry: Meet Distant West’s Johnny Wu

Concerning cultural intercourse

posted by Pauline Luppert on Mon, Mar 22, 2010
in Events , General theatre talk

Bookmark and Share

In one of my favorite quotes from a review of Concerning Strange Devices from the Distant West, The San Francisco Chronicle's Rob Hurwitt said scenes from the show "set the mind spinning about topics as varied as the art and commerce of photography, the ways in which humans love and use one another, a Coco zhou century of intercourse between Japan and America . . ." I love this concept of cultures having intercourse. It's sexy, and so much more dynamic than cultures "influencing" each other or "exchanging" with each other.

On that note, an upcoming evening event on Thursday, April 1 at The Asian Art Museum set my mind spinning about a century of intercourse between Shanghai and America.

Here's how the museum describes the event: "Dubbed 'the boy Billie Holiday,' Coco Zhao (seen right) performs an intimate set of original works and Shanghai jazz favorites in conjunction with the special exhibition Shanghai. Jazz thrived in Shanghai’s colorful cabarets and dance halls during the ’20s and ’30s. Suppressed during the Cultural Revolution, it’s enjoyed a renaissance thanks to a new generation of jazz musicians. Zhao cross-pollinates Mandarin vocals with distinct sounds of contemporary American jazz; his unique heritage (his parents performed traditional Chinese opera) is infused with youthful interpretations."

The event begins at 5pm and features a cash bar and various exhibit-related activities. Tickets are $10, but the museum is giving away some free tickets. Click here for a chance to win.

Watch a video of Coco Zhou performing at the Yokohama jazz festival:

Comments:

Anyone else think Jazz with Chinese vocals just sounds awesome?

I know that it lacks the rhyming that lots of Jazz uses, but there's something calming about Chinese vocals.

Quinn the HSK Guy | Wed, Dec 18, 2013


The comments to this entry are closed.